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Epidemiology

Mask Myths

One of the most effective ways of controlling the spread of respiratory viruses, such as the COVID-19 virus, is by wearing face masks. Last weekend at the Ohio Statehouse, a group of anti-maskers protested the wearing of face masks, complete with an escort of camo-wearing, body armor-clad, AR-15-wielding gun enthusiasts, presumably there to protect the protesters from throngs of violent mask-wearers. The protesters offered a multitude of reasons why people should not wear masks and so I thought this would be an opportune time to examine some common mask myths.

  1. You can get carbon dioxide poisoning. This theory espoused by anti-maskers proposes that carbon dioxide builds up inside of masks and then when one inhales, they inspire toxic quantities of carbon dioxide leading to disease and death. Carbon dioxide is a gas and cannot build up in a cloth or fiber mask. If it did, we would have to pay surgeons and OR nurses hazard pay since they have worn masks daily for decades. It appears that the protestors confused wearing a cloth mask with tying a plastic trash bag over one’s head.
  2. Masks cover up the image of God. This is the reason that state representative Nino Vitale from Urbana, Ohio used when he refused to wear a mask over his face inside the Ohio Statehouse. Mr. Vitale has quite a celestial opinion of himself and it is suspected that he refuses to wear pants in public for the same reason.
  3. Only N-95 masks protect you. N-95 masks are only necessary when performing aerosol-generating procedures and not when performing routing patient care or when out among the public. As long as you are not performing an upper endoscopy or colonoscopy inside of a McDonalds restaurant, you don’t need an N-95 mask.
  4. Masks only need to cover the mouth and not the nose. This one is partially true… as long as you are holding your nose, it won’t matter if your mask covers it. However, if there is air coming out of your nose, then it needs to be covered.
  5. If you’re not sick, you don’t need to wear a mask. Unfortunately, only about two-thirds of people infected with the COVID-19 virus have symptoms. In other words, one-third of those infected are asymptomatic. The guy sitting on the bar stool next to you who is yelling, laughing, sneezing, or coughing could quite easily be passing the virus on to you whether or not he has a fever.
  6. You only need to wear masks indoors. The idea is that sunlight kills the virus. Although it is true that most of the virus on surfaces is killed after about 20 minutes in direct midday sun, being in the sun will not kill viruses being passed through the air when someone coughs toward you, unless you can hold your breath for 20 minutes.
  7. Wearing a mask shuts down your immune system. Cloth masks are made of cloth, just like clothing is made of cloth. As long as your shirt is not causing you to get leukemia, your mask won’t either.
  8. Masks should be soaked in Clorox bleach before being worn. The idea behind this one is that since bleach kills viruses, any virus in the air that you breathe in will be dead-on-arrival when it gets into your lungs. Pulmonologists, such as myself, wish that this was true because if so, we would have lifetime job security from all of the asthma and lung damage caused by people inhaling bleach vapors.
  9. Wearing masks hurts the economy. Increasing numbers of viral infections hurts the economy. The economy will recover when it is safe to go to the store/theater/stadium/restaurant. Personally, I won’t walk into a public building if I seen other people not wearing masks. Wearing masks is the fastest way to rejuvenate the economy. Countries that enacted mask requirements early have recovering economies and are about to eat the United States’ lunch.
  10. Masks go against the American spirit of freedom. American freedom does not mean you have the right to infect other people with the virus. If a person is asymptomatically infected with the COVID-19 virus that person can infect others who are in contact with him/her. And if 4 of those others who get infected are over age 80, then statistically 1 of them will die. As a physician, I do not have the freedom to deny treatment to a mask-slacker who develops COVID-19 respiratory failure.

Anti-maskers join the legion of anti-vaxxers, anti-hand washers, anti-tooth brushers, and anti-bathroom users. Until we have an effective vaccine, the fastest way to get back to life as normal is to wear a mask.

July 22, 2020

 

By James Allen, MD

I am a Professor of Internal Medicine at the Ohio State University and the Medical Director of Ohio State University East Hospital